Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window), Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window), Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window), Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window), Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window), Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window), Want a Free Book? LEIPZIG, Germany — The brain activity of classical and jazz musicians are wildly different, even when they play the same piece of music, a new study finds. The process involves a highly complex cerebral symphony, if you will, featuring many highly developed parts of the brain. View my writing at http://rennerb1.wixsite.com/benrenner. A new study finds that the brains of jazz pianists and classical piano players work differently — even when performing the same piece of music. A small study by Emily Przysinda of Wesleyan University suggests that the brains of jazz musicians react differently to unexpected events than the brains of … The brain activity of jazz musicians is substantially different from that of classical musicians, even when they’re playing the same piece of music. Electronic monitoring revealed these players have "markedly different neural sensitivity to unexpected musical stimuli," the researchers write. A new study out of Leipzig found that jazz and classical pianists use their brains differently while playing the same music. Subscribe to the Six-Bullet Saturday Newsletter. A new study shows that piano players who specialize in classical music have a different brain structure than those who generally play jazz. WANT MORE STUDIES? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have found that different processes occur in the brains of classical and jazz musicians, even when playing the same piece of music. Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. The brain circuits work differently for jazz and classical pianists, a study has found, which may explain why even professional musicians find it difficult to switch between the two styles. They may be better, for example, at recalling a list of random words. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and … The brain circuits work differently for jazz and classical pianists, a study has found, which may explain why even professional musicians find it difficult to switch between the two styles. From an early age, musicians learn complex motor and auditory skills (e.g., the translation of visually perceived musical symbols into motor commands with simultaneous auditory monitoring of output), which they practice extensively from childhood throughout their entire careers. CLICK HERE TO FOLLOW STUDYFINDS.ORG ON FACEBOOK! Carla Bray, Harpist. Learn how your comment data is processed. The key finding from the research, from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, is that the brains of jazz and classical pianists work differently. January 16, 2018 Miles Davis is not Mozart: The brains of jazz and classical pianists work differently by Max Planck Society When the scientists asked the … The study compared 30 musicians, half classically trained, the other half trained in jazz while playing the piano. The study adds to a stock of work on the brain processes involved in forms of creativity. ( Log Out /  The brain activity of jazz musicians is substantially different from that of classical musicians, even when they're playing the same piece of music. Jazz musicians are famous for their musical conversations -- one improvises a few bars and another plays an answer. Change ). Polyphonic overtone singing  explained visually. A musician's brain is different to that of a non-musician. The contents of this website do not constitute advice and are provided for informational purposes only. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig have recently discovered that these capabilities are embedded in a much more finely-tuned way than previously assumed—and even differ depending on the style of the music: They observed that the brain activity of jazz pianists differs from those of classical pianists, even when playing the same piece … “Through this study, we unravelled how precisely the brain adapts to the demands of our surrounding environment,” says Daniela Sammler, neuroscientist at MPI CBS and leader of the study, in a news release. c Makes Women More Attracted to Men, Study Finds, Study: Internet, Human Brain Use Similar Algorithms to Process Info, Hip-Hop Fans Prefer Positive Rappers, But Labels Overlook Them, Study Finds, Men Sing More Frequently About Sex, Women About Love In Top Hits, Study Finds, Study: Weaker Attention Spans To Blame For Pop Mus, Want To Lower Stress At The Office? Stoked to learn of this study and so glad we’re beginning to learn more about improvisation in music. The full study was published in the journal NeuroImage. Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. classicfm.com Brains of jazz and classical musicians work differently, study reveals Scientists have discovered that these capabilities are embedded in a much more finely tuned way than assumed: The brain activity of jazz pianists differs from those of …