Final part in a series The contributions of David Blight’s Race and Reunion to the scholarship on Reconstruction and historical memory are undeniably some of the most valuable (and most-cited) in contemporary historiography on the American Civil War. The Civil War and Reconstruction with David Blight - YouTube Now www.youtube.com This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War , from the 1840s to 1877. As David Blight says in his novel, Race and Reunion, ... (Blight 2). In 1865, confronted with a ravaged landscape and a torn America, the North and South began a slow and painful process of reconciliation. David Blight has an op ed in the Washington Post contra calls to remove the statue of Lincoln as the Great Emancipator in D.C. Critics say the imagery itself is racist, and David Blight, a professor of history at Yale University, agrees. It was a huge problem in the Reconstruction states. ” —Mark Dunkelman, The Providence Sunday Journal “ Blight’s analysis is compelling. David Blight reveals an African-American world that "knew what time it was," and welcomed war. In this lecture, Professor Blight begins his engagement with Reconstruction. David Blight argues, “The great challenge of Reconstruction is to determine how a national blood feud could be reconciled at the same time a new nation emerged out of war and social revolution.” Each of the prevalent visions were heavily influenced by political motives at the time. Under Johnson's stewardship, southern whites held constitutional conventions throughout 1865, drafting new constitutions that outlawed slavery but changed little else. To download and subscribe to The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877 - Video by David Blight, get iTunes now. In the war's aftermath, Americans had to embrace and cast off a traumatic past. Yale University: The Civil War and Reconstruction with David Blight This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War, from the 1840s to 1877. David Rothenberg for The New York ... and thereby prompted a second founding of the United States in the three great constitutional amendments of Reconstruction. David Blight: Reconstruction falls apart in the south for many reasons, and I want to stress again it was in many ways defeated by the white south, politically and even militarily. Blight first describes the causes of the Market Revolution--the rise of capital, a transportation revolution--and then moves to its effects on the culture and consciousness of antebellum northerners. David W. Blight is the Sterling Professor of History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University. David Blight: Origins and Legacies of the Fourteenth Amendment David Blight, Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University and Director of the GLC, introduces the panel and places the origins of the Fourteenth Amendment in the context of the “re-imagination of the U.S. Constitution” as necessitated by the Civil War and its aftermaths. While Robert E. Lee battled Grant to a stalemate in Virginia, however, William Tecumseh Sherman’s Union forces took Atlanta before beginning their March to the Sea, destroying Confederate morale and fighting power from the inside. David Blight reflects on America’s Disunion – then and now “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just,” Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1781. The American revolution still raged, many of his own slaves had escaped, his beloved Virginia teetered on social and political chaos. In his historical non-fiction book Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (2001), American historian and author David W. Blight argues that in the four decades following the Civil War, the dominant narrative that emerged of the war was not one of fighting to end the horrors of slavery and to ensure freedom for all Americans. David Blight conceives of America purely as an idea, so he can easily portray it as what he believes it ought to be. Reconstruction, Blight suggests, might best be understood as an extended referendum on the meaning of the Civil War. Even before the war's end, various constituencies in the North attempted to control the shape of the post-war Reconstruction of the South. The primary goal of the course is to understand the multiple meanings of a transforming event in American history. How we remember the Civil War is the subject of David Blight's excellent Race and Reunion.